Tag Archives: Department of Neighborhoods

Durkan nominates three new department heads and one interim one (UPDATED)

Today Mayor Jenny Durkan announced that she has submitted nominations to the City Council to make permanent three of her interim department head appointments: Sue McNab at the Department of Human Resources, Calvin Goings at the Department of Finance and Administrative Services, and Andrés Mantilla at the Department of Neighborhoods. Durkan also announced that Linea Laird would take over for Goran Sparrman as interim Director of the Department of Transportation while the search process for a permanent SDOT director finishes up.

Continue reading Durkan nominates three new department heads and one interim one (UPDATED)

Department of Neighborhoods says more about District Councils, some of it meaningful

Today the Department of Neighborhoods posted a message from Director Kathy Nyland confirming that it had sent legislation to the Council, rewriting its charter, which is identical to what the Eastlake Community Council posted earlier this week.

Continue reading Department of Neighborhoods says more about District Councils, some of it meaningful

Department of Neighborhoods equivocates on support for District Councils, insulates itself

The Department of Neighborhoods seems determined to leave everyone guessing as to what kind of support it will provide to District Councils moving forward. And in the meantime, it’s moving to insulate itself further from accountability to the communities it serves.

Continue reading Department of Neighborhoods equivocates on support for District Councils, insulates itself

Take the Department of Neighborhoods survey

In a follow-up step to the Mayor’s announcement that he is discontinuing ties to the Neighborhood District Councils, the Department of Neighborhoods has posted a quick survey to gather statistics on how residents want to receive information from city government.

You can take the survey here.

One can assume that this isn’t the only outreach the Department of Neighborhoods will do as it figures out how to replace the DC’s. The questions it asks in the survey are a start, but the issues run much deeper. More than anything else, this survey will serve to provide supporting evidence that ethnicity and language are two other dimensions of “community” that aren’t represented by the current geography-based structure.